HUSBANDS (1970, USA)
directed by: John Cassavetes

BACK TO THE DATABASE

IMDB link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065867

Submitted by Charley Leary on 2006-10-22

Charley Leary's comment:
Using advanced mode, trying an approach similiar, I think, to Charles O'Brien's recent submissions. HUSBANDS, of course, is not a musical, though there is a fair amount of singing. The variables are:

sing = character(s) are singing (there may be talking in the shot as well)
talk = dialogue, characters are just talking
silence = no talking (or singing) the film is never completely silent howver: background noise usually is traffic or wind
music = non-diegetic music; this only occurs over the opening photo montage

There's a difference of 11 shots between my Simple Mode submission and this one...


Name:
sing
talk
silence
music
Number of shots:
34
300
115
21
Length(min):
14.07
95.59
14.25
1.18
ASL(sec):
24.8
19.1
7.4
3.4
MSL 13.3 7.8 5 3.1
MSL/ASL
0.54
0.41
0.67
0.92
StDev 24.4 44.4 7 1.1
Min 2 0.8 0.9 1.2
Max 86.3 542.6 38.4 6.2
CV 0.98 2.32 0.94 0.34
Display?
Color        
Loading...

Step: Vertical resolution: Height:
Degree of the trendline: Moving average : Color code?


Users' comments:

Author: Yuri Tsivian Date: 2006-10-22

Interesting. Even though "talks" seem to have generated the longest takes (light blue "icicles" are by far the longest, see at Height 1000) the overall ASL is higher for "singing" shots. The discrepancy between the "sing+talk" ASLs on the one hand and "music+silence" ASL on the other is amazing (two-digit numbers here, on-digit numbers there) -- uncheck the corresponding boxes to see this. The categories Charlie has chosen here show well the correlation of editing with sound. Sections without speech are markedly faster. It may not be by chance that these results tally with Barry Salt's and (more recent) Charles O'Brien's findings regarding the growth of worldwide ASL's with the advent of the talkies in the late 1920s-early 1930s (Charles O?Brien, Cinema?s Conversion to Sound: Technology and Film Style in France and the U.S. / Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2005).

Author: Charles O'Brien Date: 2006-10-24

Yes, the multi-colored trendline is interesting, with its big asl difference between "silent" shots and "talk" and "sing" shots. Charles Leary's examples of ambient-sound accompaniment for the silent shots suggests that these shots involve exteriors, in contrast to the talk and sing shots, which presumably occur mainly indoors. Also, the pattern of dispersal, whereby the silent shots come in multi-shot clusters, suggests that they may be scene transitions. Following on Yuri's suggestion, this sort of arrangement is indeed common in many early sound movies, in which the cutting picks up during transitions between scenes, but slows during mid-scene dialogue.

Author: Yuri Tsivian Date: 2006-10-24

I second Charles' thought about the need to factor in the indoor/outdoor distinctions. I noticed the difference in Sacile as I was timing Danish and American films of the teens, that most of the times as soon as we are out, the cutting speeds up. Staging conditions differ significantly depending on whether this is a William Hart Western or an August Blom salon melodrama in the first place, which may partly account for the differences in the cutting rates.

And yes, it might be of interest to double-time silent and sound sections in early part-talkies and goat-gland movies to see how theses sections look against each other cuttingwise.


Add your own comment:
Your name:




Enter code from above picture: